Monday, February 02, 2009

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Do You Have To Water These Metallic Flowers?

Photographs copyright: DAVID McMAHON


Okay, so they’re not the sort of flowers you would expect, but I could not resist this shot. It was taken in the Yukon late last year, as we drove from Fox Creek to Dawson City. It was a quick refuelling stop and as always, I wandered around looking for unusual sights.

This was in Braeburn, which, as a nearby sign proclaimed, is one of the checkpoints in the famous Yukon Quest.

These metal flowers on a bench caught my eye immediately, not just because of the quality of the craftsmanship, but also because the blue and silver contrasted so beautifully with the wooden border.

It was only later, when we got back into the 4WD and drove off, that a thought occurred to me. Given the solitude of the Yukon and the tiny communities that live off the historic landscape, there was a fair chance that these flowers were crafted by someone who lived locally.

I should have gone inside and asked the owners if they knew who the craftsman was. There is always a rich story behind any piece of art. It’s up to us to seek those stories out.


Visit Luiz Santilli Jr for the home of
Today's Flowers.

28 comments:

Denise said...

I agree, like a painting on the wall, I try to find out all about the painter before I even buy a piece. Lovely post as always.

Poutalicious said...

I'm looking around my living room and I have ten framed paintings and I know nothing about the artists. It might be a very worthwhile project for me to do some investigating; increasing my depth and perception of the pieces. Great post!

jinksy said...

The crafted flowers are lovely, but the bright orange red ad against the blue background is STUNNING!

Indrani said...

The metallic flowers look beautiful with the blue background.

I read about the heat wave there, hope you are not affected much. (There is a slight mix up of the meme logos.)

imac said...

I guess if you watered them, they would turn a rusty colour, Eh David.lol.

theArthurClan said...

That's such a lovely piece of art and you captured it beautifully.

TheWritersPorch said...

David...World Traveler that you are
I'm sure you've benn to the French Quarter in New Orleans and seen the beautiful ornamental iron fences? My favorite is the Corn Stalks fence.I love these types of Photography!

ispeakbeanish said...

They are beautiful. I love the juxtaposition with the "motorcycle friendly" sign. It just works.

A Thousand Clapping Hands said...

You've sent an important message out into the world. Those who change the way they think when sighting crafts such as these on their daily travels, or even while visiting museums, will find their understanding of art and their lives to be so much richer and far more rewarding. Lessons like this are meant to be shared. Give yourself the Post of the Day!!! Excellent.
Catherine

Darla said...

Very pretty although I probably would not water them, LOL.

George said...

You may not have gotten the story behind the flowers but at least you got the flowers themselves and you shared them with us.

Judy said...

It must have been a real labour of love to make that bench!! I think your photos emphasize that!
Thanks for sharing! And for making me think about the people who made it, and who make other beautiful things!

The Quintessential Magpie said...

Neat shot, David! When I saw it roll up on blogger, I thought it was a grate of some sort. I like surprises like that. :-)

Stay safe!

Sheila

Millennium Housewife said...

I'm right there with you David, too many opportunities are lost to find out about the history of something. It takes seconds to ask, and I find people are only too happy to tell you what they think (even ifit's completely untrue!)

Moannie said...

Another wonderfully painterly picture, David SK

Jazz said...

Beautiful bench...

Naturegirl said...

David perhaps they are so frquently emulated in art because flowers have always formed part of the more agreeable side of life..as does sitting and relaxing on this bench!

Gill - That British Woman said...

lovely photo's and I'm guessing they won't need watering...LOL

Gill in Canada

gogouci said...

and you made a very nice picture of it! Realy like it.

Hilary said...

Interesting! The first shot looks like a metal plate for printing with blue ink on it... The second shot really surprised me.

Craig Glenn said...

David,

I ran by the shot several times today in google reader and I have to say it really caught my attention. Nice.

Craig

Tammie Lee said...

ah, perfect winter flowers! They never wilt and fade. They are also perfect for the traveler! I agree, wonderful contrast!

napaboaniya said...

You've always amazed me with your keen eye on objects.
Have a good week ahead David!

Day4plus said...

And now we will never know-----but the flowers are beautiful against the blue metal wall. MB

cheshire wife said...

Those metal flowers are great! They will survive any conditions. They won't need watering and neither will they wilt or die.

Auto Parts for Brains said...

What makes this interesting is that it is actually a back rest of a bench. I agree with you that this tells a story. It is very evident that the flowers have had their share of wear. Who knows how many have spent their time resting on them while contemplating life's riddles. How many lovers have brushed their hands against them while sharing an intimate kiss. How many kids have traced them with their fingers while killing time with a friend.

I love how you see beauty in small things like these. I guess that's what makes you a good author David.

Keep on writing regularly. Your zeal is something I always aspire for, yet cannot seem to acquire.

I will always be a grateful apprentice.

blossom said...

Aha ... something different ... Still, as beautiful!

San said...

Like you, I was smitten by the rich blue and silver contrasting with the wood. But seeing the rest of that blue field, punctuated by the orange--just gorgeous.

I believe we all enjoy the stories behind art. People in the gallery enjoy that, and as I always tell them, there's a story too behind how someone comes to acquire an artwork. Sometimes that's as significant as is the story of what brought the art into being.